What Makes a Single Zone System the Best Choice for a Small Home or Room Addition?

January 22nd, 2015 by Charlene Ierna

Expanding your home is a big task, and one that requires serious HVAC work. But what if you could avoid installing ductwork into your home, and still have heating and cooling that matches the rest of your home? You can, with a Mitsubishi single zone ductless system in Wesley Chapel. With a single zone system, you can add the needed heating and cooling to a new addition without having to spend thousands on extending your home’s ductwork. Or, if you have a room in your home that is notoriously too hot during summer or too cold during winter, you can easily add supplemental warm air or cold air to that space with a single zone unit.

How Does It Work?

A single zone ductless system works the same as a multi-zone system, just on a smaller scale. With a single zone, you still have an outdoor unit and an indoor blower, but you also get a wireless remote thermostat to program the heating and cooling. The in- and outdoor units are connected by a conduit through which the refrigerant flows, and when the indoor unit turns on, the heating or cooling process begins.

Special Attributes of the Mitsubishi Single Zone System

Inverter Technology

One specialized detail of the Mitsubishi Single Zone System is that it comes equipped with Inverter technology. The technology allows the speed of the compressor to work on a varied basis in accordance with heating and cooling need of the room. The result is even cooling that is energy efficient.

Extra Filtration

Most indoor ductless units come with two filters; the Mitsubishi Single Zone System comes with three. Triple filters help capture a number of airborne contaminants including allergens, viruses and bacteria.

Quiet Operation

The Mitsubishi Single Zone System has been designed with quiet in mind. The blowers have compartmentalized components which helps reduce operation noise considerably.

A single zone ductless system may be just what you need for a new expansion or intemperate room in your home, so contact Ierna’s Heating & Cooling today!

Common Problems Found During Routine Furnace Maintenance

January 15th, 2015 by Charlene Ierna

Here in Florida, it’s not too often during the course of the year that we find ourselves switching on the furnace. But once you do, you may end up discovering that it doesn’t seem to run quite as well as it once did. Your furnace probably isn’t worn down because it’s been overworked over the years. More than likely, your furnace is simply suffering because dirt and debris has built up after a lack of use, or because some of the parts are simply not in the best shape they can be. And if you keep your unit running when it’s not in top condition, you may end up damaging some vital components.

One of the ways to discover these repair needs early on is by calling a professional for heating maintenance every year. During maintenance, a technician inspects your entire system. Some adjustments can be made on the scene, while big jobs may need to be rescheduled for later. Here are some of the most common problems that the experts at Ierna’s Heating & Cooling.

  • Dirty Flame Sensor: The flame sensor is a safety component that detects when there is no flame present, which then sends out a signal to shut off the gas valve. If this part is too dirty, it may eventually fail to detect a flame, shutting off the gas valve so that you don’t have any heat even when there is no real threat to your safety.
  • Dirty Filter: Believe it or not, a dirty filter can contribute to a lot of problems with a furnace over the years. If the filter is too dirty, it can restrict airflow to the unit, potentially leading to an overheated chamber, or causing parts to become overworked and worn down. A technician will let you know if the filter is too dirty and may recommend beginning a schedule so that you remember to replace it every few months or so.
  • Damage to the Flue Pipe: The heating technician will do a thorough inspection of your entire unit, including the portion that helps to vent combustion gases outdoors safely. If there are any potential cracks or rust, or if the vent pipe is the wrong size, the technician may recommend replacing it.

The technicians at Ierna’s Heating & Cooling offer thorough heating maintenance in Tampa. Give us a call today!

Choosing a System for Your Light Commercial Heating Needs

January 8th, 2015 by Charlene Ierna

When running a business, no matter the size, your heating system has to be both effective and energy efficient; after all, it doesn’t serve you or your business well if most of your budget is going toward heating your commercial space. So what are your options when it comes to light commercial heating in Odessa? Here are some system choices to consider:

Packaged Unit

Packaged units come in a variety of combinations to allow you to both heat and cool your space with a single, packaged unit. The main 3 combinations include:

  • A hybrid heating system (heat pump combined with back-up gas furnace)
  • Gas furnace/whole-space air conditioner
  • Heat pump system

Working with a trained expert can help you decide what type of packaged unit will work best for your space, your employees and your business.

Split-System Heating: Two Choices

When it comes to having a split heating system, where part of the system is housed outdoors and the other is indoors, you have 2 main choices:

  • Heat pump
  • Hybrid system

With both a heat pump system and hybrid system, you have an outdoor unit that contains the condenser and compressor. The outdoor unit absorbs the available heat in the air, concentrates it, then blows the warm air into your business space. In the summer, it’s the opposite: the warm air inside is absorbed and transferred to the outdoors.

Hybrid systems take things a step further: with a hybrid system, you have a back-up gas furnace that turns on automatically when the air temperature outside reaches a certain degree, usually around the freezing mark. This is because heat pumps absorb heat from the air outdoors, and when the air becomes cold, there is less available heat to absorb. In a hybrid system, the outdoor unit is equipped with a sensor that reads the temperature, and when the outdoor air reaches the temperature you’ve pre-set, typically a few degrees above freezing, your dual-fuel thermostat automatically switches to the back-up gas furnace for heating. A second pre-set temperature setting switches the heating action back to the heat pump.

If you are having difficulty deciding what kind of light commercial heating system to install in Odessa, call Ierna’s Heating & Cooling today and schedule an appointment with one of our experts.

Why Do I Need an Indoor and Outdoor Unit for Heat Pump Installation?

January 2nd, 2015 by Charlene Ierna

At first glance, the components involved in heat pump installation may seem a bit odd. The indoor heating unit fits right in, occupying much the same spot as any other central heating system. The outdoor unit, however, can be installed as far as 100 feet away from the house. It can be difficult to understand why that outdoor unit is necessary, as it certainly doesn’t seem to be helping to heat the home from that far away. Once you understand how a heat pump works, however, it all makes sense. Let’s examine the heat pump system, and why it needs both units.

Heat Pump Construction

As you may or may not know, a heat pump is not a combustion-based heating system. Unlike furnaces and boilers, which largely burn fuel to create heat, a heat pump merely moves heat from one place to another. This is part of what makes heat pumps so energy efficient. They only need electricity to operate, and consume no other fuel to work.

The way that a heat pump moves heat involves the indoor and outdoor units working together. Though they can be installed quite far apart, the two units are connected by a conduit that contains power and refrigerant lines. The refrigerant line is connected to a coil in each unit, which is vital to the operation of the entire system.

When the heat is turned on, the outdoor unit begins to evaporate the refrigerant in its coil. This turns the gaseous refrigerant into a heat sink, drawing thermal energy out of the air around the unit and into the coil. The refrigerant gas then carries that heat to the indoor unit, which converts the refrigerant back into a liquid. This process releases the heat, which is used to warm the air in the home.

So you see, the outdoor unit is the unit that actually provides the heat to your home. Without it, the heat pump would be a fan and not much else.

If you’d like to know more about your heat pump, call Ierna’s Heating & Cooling. We provide heat pump installation all over Tampa.

12 Grapes for 12 Months: An Unusual New Year’s Tradition

January 1st, 2015 by Charlene Ierna

Across the world, many cultures have specific traditions to celebrate the transition from the old year to the new. In the U.S. and Canada, we associate New Year’s with the ball in Times Square, kissing at the stroke of midnight, resolutions, and singing “Old Lang Syne.” But for many Spanish-speaking countries, one of the key traditions has to do with eating grapes as fast as possible.

The “twelve grapes” tradition comes from Spain, where it is called las doce uvas de la suerte (“The Twelve Lucky Grapes”). To ensure good luck for the next year, people eat one green grape for each of the upcoming twelve months. However, you cannot just eat the grapes during the first day of the new year any time you feel like it. You must eat the twelve grapes starting at the first stroke of midnight on Nochevieja (“Old Night,” New Year’s Eve) as one year changes to another. And you have to keep eating: with each toll of midnight, you must eat another grape, giving you about twelve seconds to consume all of them. If you can finish all dozen grapes—you can’t still be chewing on them!—before the last bell toll fades, you will have a luck-filled new year.

Where did this tradition come from? No one is certain, although it appears to be more than a century old. One story about the Twelve Lucky Grapes is that a large crop of grapes in 1909 in Alicante, Spain led to the growers seeking out a creative way to eliminate their surplus. But recent research through old newspapers shows that perhaps the tradition goes back almost thirty years earlier to the 1880s, where eating grapes was meant to mock the upper classes who were imitating the French tradition of dining on grapes and drinking champagne on New Year’s Eve.

It can be difficult to consume grapes this fast, and the lucky grapes of New Year’s Eve have seeds in them, making the job even trickier. (Seedless grapes are not common in Spain the way they are over here.) For people to manage eating all the grapes before the last stroke of midnight requires swallowing the seeds as well and only taking a single bite of each grape.

Oh, there is one more twist to the tradition: you have to be wearing red undergarments, and they have to be given to you as a gift. The origins of this part of the tradition are even more mysterious, and it’s anybody’s guess why this started.

Whether you go for the grape challenge or find another way to ring in New Year’s, all of us at IERNA’s Heating & Cooling hope you have a great start to the year and a fruitful 2015.

The Composition of Snowflakes: Are No Two Alike?

December 25th, 2014 by Charlene Ierna

“No two snowflakes are alike.”

This is a statement nearly every schoolchild has heard at least once, either while crafting unique snowflakes with a sheet of folded paper and some scissors or while learning a lesson on the science of snow. While even most scientists don’t quite understand what causes a snowflake to form such complex and beautiful columns and points and branches, one thing is for certain, the composition of snowflakes guarantees that no two will ever be identical.  However, it is possible for two snowflakes to appear to be nearly exactly alike.

A snowflake begins to form when a piece of dust catches water vapor out of the air. Water is created when two hydrogen molecules attach to an oxygen molecule. The two hydrogen molecules are angled from one another in such a way that they form a hexagonal shape when they come together during the freezing process; thus, a snowflake begins as a simple hexagonal shape or as layers of hexagons called diamond dust. The emergent properties that follow from the original hexagon are what differentiate one snowflake from another, as the humidity, the temperature in the air, and many other factors (some of which remain unclear to scientists) allow each snowflake to form in an entirely unique way with a seemingly endless variety of shapes.

However, in 1988, a scientist named Nancy Knight claimed to have located two that were the same while studying snowflakes as part of an atmospheric research project. And it appeared to be so; when put under a microscope, the emergent properties looked nearly identical. But while it is feasible that two snowflakes can appear to be exactly alike on the outside, they are never identical on an atomic level. Deuterium is an atom that appears attached to about one in every 3000 hydrogen molecules in the air. Because there are millions of atoms that make up a snowflake, the random assortment of deuterium in any two snowflakes—even in two that so very closely resemble one another—simply cannot be the same.

Here at Ierna Heating & Cooling, we’d like to remind you to grab a cup of cocoa and relax with your family this holiday, perhaps by crafting some unique snowflake creations of your own. We wish you a very happy holiday season, from our family to yours!

The Many Advantages of Nest Thermostats

December 18th, 2014 by Charlene Ierna

Thermostat technology has made incredible progress over the past couple of decades. From manual, to digital, to programmable, homeowners are being given more and more control over how their indoor climate is regulated. Now, the next step in that progression has arrived in the form of Nest thermostats. Let’s examine what the Nest thermostat is, and why you should consider installing one in your home.

Adaptability

By now, homeowners know about programmable thermostats. Most digital thermostats are now equipped with options for day and night cycles, as well as days of the week. Pretty much any time of day can have its own dedicated setting with programmable thermostats, and this is a very good thing. The problem is that a lot of these options are hidden behind complicated button combinations and menu settings. Nest is a different kind of animal altogether.

Nest thermostats revolve around an extremely simple and efficient design. You turn the temperature up, or down, and over the first few days the Nest thermostat will begin to learn from your heating and cooling habits. Eventually, the thermostat will set the temperature for you without instruction. If you keep turning your thermostat off at night to save energy, the Nest will remember to turn itself off even if you forget.

You can also set the Nest thermostat to have an energy-saving away temperature when you’re out of the house. This prevents it from wasting energy heating an empty home. In a similar manner, Nest has several ways to make suggestions regarding saving money on heating. When you’re adjusting the thermostat and a small leaf appears on the display, that’s Nest telling you that you’re saving energy and money.

Interconnectivity

In keeping with our increasingly online lifestyles, the Nest thermostat is capable of remote capabilities. If you’re driving home after a long day, and you don’t want the house to be freezing when you get home, just open the Nest app on your phone and set the temperature you want. By the time you get home, your house will be nice and comfortable.

If you’d like to know more about Nest thermostats, call Ierna’s Heating & Cooling. We install thermostats throughout Riverview.

Lutz Heating Repair Guide: Cracked Heat Exchangers

December 11th, 2014 by Charlene Ierna

There are a lot of urban legends about the dangers of certain kinds of heating systems, and while there is some truth to certain problems, there are only a few truly dangerous situations that can develop with your furnace. One of these is operating a furnace with a cracked heat exchanger. During annual heating maintenance, your heat exchanger is inspected for corrosion, rust and cracks for safety and function purposes; this is one of many reasons why it’s important to schedule annual maintenance for your furnace. First, we’ll explain what a heat exchanger is.

What Is a Heat Exchanger?

A heat exchanger is the component in your furnace that helps generate the heat that is blown into your home; it also is the component that keeps the toxic combustion byproducts of your furnace’s burner from entering your home. The heat exchanger is a moderately-size serpentine tube that is open on both ends. When the burner ignites, it heats the heat exchanger; while the heat generates, combustion byproducts like noxious gases and soot enter the bottom of the heat exchanger and flow up. The top of the heat exchanger is connected directly to your furnace’s flue, and the toxic byproducts flow directly outside. The warm air generated outside the heat exchanger is blown into your ductwork.

What Happens With a Cracked Heat Exchanger?

The main problem that can occur with a cracked heat exchanger is that the toxic byproducts – including gases like carbon monoxide – can escape during operation and be blown into your living spaces. Additional problems can be poor performance and an inability of the system to meet your heating needs.

Why Does a Heat Exchanger Crack?

One of the main causes of cracking is age. The average heat exchanger has a lifespan of 15-18 years, similar to that of the lifespan of your furnace. Over time, the constant heating and cooling of the heat exchanger’s metal can weaken it, eventually causing cracking. A second cause of cracking is the development of rust or corrosion on the heat exchanger; corrosion can make a heat exchanger prone to cracking.

Heat exchangers cannot be repaired if they are cracked; replacement is required to repair your heating in Lutz.

If you suspect your heat exchanger may not be working properly, call the experts at Ierna’s Heating & Cooling today!

Schedule Maintenance Today for Your Light Commercial Heating System

December 4th, 2014 by Charlene Ierna

Your light commercial heating system won’t run forever, but it can last well over a decade with the proper maintenance. Here in Tampa, it’s not often that we need to switch into heating mode. Because of this, you may forget that maintenance is vital to the performance of a heater, just as it is with an air conditioner. If it’s been a couple of years or more since your heater has gotten a tune up, there’s certainly a chance that something may go wrong.

Professional maintenance is the best way to protect your system from damage or from a premature breakdown. If you schedule maintenance today, it’s unlikely that you’ll notice any further repair needs this heating season. Besides, light commercial heating system maintenance may increase the lifespan of your unit and improve efficiency. Standard wear and tear on your commercial system means the parts end up using a lot of energy to run, but a tune up can save you a lot over time.

Can’t I Perform Maintenance On My Own?

Maintenance is not something that just anyone can perform. Professionals simply know the ins and outs of heating systems to better protect and prolong the life of your system. Most heating technicians have years of experience and training, and understand what to look for when inspecting to damage and making minor adjustments. Without the proper skills, you may clean a component using the incorrect procedures or gloss over an important repair need. Always trust heating experts to make sure your system is in top shape before they leave.

During professional maintenance, a technician cleans and adjusts various components of the system and thoroughly inspects each and every part. Even a light commercial heating system may be quite large, and some hidden parts could be in trouble. Your technician will let you know if a component needs repair so that you can schedule service now, before a major problem leads to a breakdown on the day your business needs heating the most.

Contact Ierna’s Heating & Cooling to learn more about how you can improve comfort on your commercial property by scheduling annual light commercial heating system maintenance in Tampa.

10 Facts You Should Know about Thanksgiving

November 27th, 2014 by Charlene Ierna

Thanksgiving has been celebrated as an official holiday in the United States for over 150 years, so you may think you understand all there is to know about this family feast. Most of us have heard the story of the pilgrims’ first Thanksgiving in 1621 after arriving in North America on the Mayflower. But did you know that only about half of the people on this ship were actually pilgrims? This fact is one of ten things that may actually surprise you about the Thanksgiving tradition!

  1. Although we often consider Thanksgiving a holiday unique to the United States, many other countries and cultures celebrate their own set of harvest-time and thanksgiving traditions. In Korea, Chu-Sok (or “fall evening”) is put on in remembrance of forefathers on August 15th of every year. Brazil celebrates a contemporary version of the U.S. holiday. Chinese, Roman, and Jewish cultures all have a history of harvest celebrations as well.
  2. President Harry S. Truman began the tradition of a ceremony held before Thanksgiving during which the president receives a turkey. George H.W. Bush was the first to pardon the turkey instead of eating it.
  3. In Minnesota alone, farmers raise over 40 million turkeys a year. In fact, U.S. farmers produce about one turkey for every one person in the country.
  4. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, the average American will gain about one to two pounds every year during the holiday season.
  5. On the other hand, turkey is naturally high in protein and has been known to support and boost immune systems to protect against illness and speed up healing. So feast on!
  6. Abraham Lincoln issued a “Thanksgiving Proclamation” in 1863, but a woman named Sarah Josepha Hale can be credited with the idea. While Thanksgiving had been celebrated at different times of year in many areas of the U.S. for years, it was Hale, prominent magazine editor and author of the rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” who urged Lincoln to finally establish the national event.
  7. President Franklin D Roosevelt once tried to change the date of Thanksgiving to the second-to-last Thursday of the month in order to extend the holiday shopping season and boost the economy.
  8. Only about half of the people on the Mayflower were what we would consider today as “Pilgrims.” The other (approximately) 50 people were simply trying to find a way over to the New World.
  9. Gobble, gobble! Click, click? While male turkeys make a gobbling noise, females (hens) do not; it’s often described as a clicking.
  10. Even though we celebrate Thanksgiving on the last Thursday of November, the month of June has been declared National Turkey Lovers’ Month by the National Turkey Federation so you can continue the celebration in the summer as well!

From our family here at Ierna Air, we’d like to wish you and yours a very Happy Thanksgiving!