IERNA's Heating & Cooling Blog : Posts Tagged ‘Heat Pump Repair’

Why Won’t My Heat Pump Switch to Cooling Mode?

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

It’s that time of year when your heat pump begins to perform the other half of its job: providing you with steady cooling power. With just a simple change on the thermostat, the heating system that kept you warm during the rainy and overcast winter days will change over to a powerful cooling system.

But you might switch your heat pump to cooling mode only to discover that the air from your vents isn’t crisp and cool at all. It’s still heated or lukewarm. What’s wrong? And what can you do about it?

We’ll look at possible culprits for a heat pump that isn’t cooling. In most cases, you’ll need professional work to remedy the problem. For repairs on your heat pump in Wesley Chapel, FL, call the skilled team at Ierna’s Heating & Cooling.

Reasons a heat pump might not switch to cooling mode:

  • Broken reversing valve: The reversing valve is a component that changes the direction refrigerant flows through a heat pump after it exits the compressor: one direction for heating, one direction for cooling. This is the key difference between a heat pump and a standard air conditioner. If the reversing valve breaks, the heat pump will become fixed in one mode until you replace it with a new valve.
  • Malfunctioning thermostat: The thermostat may indicate that it has turned on cooling mode, but if the thermostat has lost its connection to the unit because of loose or frayed wires, then nothing that you do with the setting will change the heat pump out of heating mode. A technician can restore the thermostat’s connection to the system. You may also consider replacing the thermostat unit with an upgraded model.
  • Loss of refrigerant: If the air coming from the vents feels lukewarm, as if the heat pump is struggling to provide cool air but failing, then the pump may actually have switched over to cooling mode but loss of refrigerant due to a leak is preventing it from effectively cooling the air. A technician can locate the leak, seal it, and recharge the lost refrigerant.

The worst thing you can do for a heat pump that won’t change to cooling mode is to “wait it out,” hoping the system will fix itself and the cool air will start flowing from the vents again. This rarely happens, and the problem will likely worsen: malfunctions can spread and cause additional repair needs. Call in the specialists to fix the problem as soon as possible.

Ierna’s Heating & Cooling can help your heat pump in Wesley Chapel, FL no matter its troubles. Our trained staff is ready with 24-hour service.

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Noises That Indicate a Need for Heat Pump Repair

Monday, January 27th, 2014

When a heat pump operates normally, it produces a soothing white noise. As the compressor comes on to begin heat exchange, it adds to the whirring sound of the fan. You should not hear any other noises aside from these when you have your heat pump running. If an unusual noise interrupts the peaceful humming of your home’s heat pump, it usually means something is wrong and the unit requires attention.

Here is a list of noises that point to a need for professional repair for your heat pump. Don’t delay, because the longer the problem persists, the more likely your heat pump will break down entirely. Contact Ierna’s Heating & Cooling for help with your heat pump in Tampa, FL. We can answer your call 24 hours a day.

Listen for these warning noises:

Clicks at start-up: The first time you turn on your heat pump after a long period of inactivity, you will probably hear a clicking noise; this is normal and should vanish soon. But if it persists, or you hear it at other times, it may mean a problem with the start capacitor. The capacitor sends electric voltage to the motors to catalyze them into starting. If this capacitor breaks, your heat pump will not run. A professional must look into this problem.

Clanking: This noise often indicates that a piece of equipment inside the indoor or outdoor cabinet of the heat pump has come loose and started to strike other components. Usually it is the fan belt, which can fray and loosen because of wear. This needs to be fixed immediately before it causes damage to other parts of the heat pump.

Grinding/shrieking: Both of these sounds point toward problems with the motors. Motors run the compressors and the fans, and if they begin to develop dirt along their bearings, it will lead to the shrieking noise. A motor with dirty bearings will soon burn out and require replacement. Grinding sounds usually mean too much stress on the mechanical parts of a motor because of lack of lubrication or a dirty components. A motor making this noise usually needs to be replaced.

Enroll in preventive maintenance

You can prevent most of these problems from occurring with a regular maintenance program from a trusted contractor that provides an annual check-up for your heat pump. Technicians will look for places where components are wearing down, and clean the unit so grime will not threaten the moving parts. You’ll not only have a heat pump out of danger of needing repairs, you’ll have a heat pump working at prime energy efficiency.

Call Ierna’s Heating & Cooling today for repairs and maintenance for your heat pump in Tampa, FL.

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Heating FAQs: The Most Common Heating Repair Questions

Monday, December 10th, 2012

If you have heating questions for the Land O’ Lakes heating experts at Ierna’s Heating and Cooling, call us any time. We’ve also taken a moment to put together some of the most common heating repair questions that we get from our customers.

Why do I need a tune-up once a year?

We recommend scheduling a heating tune-up with Ierna’s Heating and Cooling once a year and before the heating season begins. This helps to prevent any problems or repairs during the colder months when you need your heater the most. Keep in mind that you should hire a qualified HVAC technician to perform any professional tune-ups to ensure that the job is done right the first time.

Why should I clean my furnace room before a repair?

Whether your furnace is in a basement or utility room, it is important to keep the area around the furnace free of debris and dirt. Clearing away storage items will also help make the equipment more accessible for repairs or an annual inspection.

Why should I not cover the outdoor unit of my heat pump system in the winter?

Because your heat pump system heats your home in the winter, it still needs to draw in air from outside. This means that you’ll need to ensure that there’s adequate airflow. Covering your outdoor unit would prevent that. It’s also a good idea to make sure that nothing else is blocking the unit and to clean the outside if it looks dirty. Dirt can clog the system and cause a number of problems that could potentially require a repair service.

If you notice any warning signs or issues with your heating system, call Ierna’s Heating and Cooling to take care of all your Land O’ Lakes heating repair and maintenance needs.

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